iEase Pelvic Floor Exerciser – Continence Management – Stress, Urge & Mixed Incontinence
iEase Pelvic Floor Exerciser – Continence Management – Stress, Urge & Mixed Incontinence
iEase Pelvic Floor Exerciser – Continence Management – Stress, Urge & Mixed Incontinence

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iEase Biofeedback Pelvic Floor Trainer

The iEase Pelvic Floor Exerciser uses revolutionary pneumatic biofeedback technology to locate and measure the strength of your pelvic floor muscle to create an effective exercise programme specifically designed to suit your needs.

 

£129.22Your Price

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Pelvic floor exercisers are one of the most effective forms of continence management and provide a discreet, affordable and long-term solution for incontinence sufferers.

The iEase Pelvic Floor Exerciser is simple and easy to use, with biofeedback technology to create programmes specifically designed for your needs. Unlike other pelvic floor exercisers, the iEase uses an inflatable probe - encouraging you to flex your pelvic floor muscle naturally, rather than using electrical stimulation.

A safe, drug-free, non-surgical solution, the iEase Pelvic Floor Exerciser provides freedom from the use of containment pads and can help sufferers return to a normal lifestyle.

Key features of the iEase Pelvic Floor Exerciser include:

Pneumatic Feedback Technology

Revolutionary biofeedback technology locates and measures the strength of your pelvic floor muscle to create an appropriate and effective exercise programme specifically designed for you.

Test Mode

The iEase assesses your pelvic floor muscle strength by instructing you to flex your pelvic floor muscle for as long as possible. Once repeated 5 times, the iEase selects the suitable strength level for Kegel exercise in the ‘Train’ mode. The Test mode also provides an objective measurement of how your pelvic floor muscle strength is improving.

Train Mode

Each tailor-made programme operates via a unique inflatable probe. Once inserted, the iEase instructs you to inflate the probe to a comfortable level to then squeeze against the probe with your pelvic floor muscle for comfortable and effective Kegel exercises.

Special Features:

  • Real-time voice alerts (mute possible)
  • Large screen display
  • Low battery warning
  • Unique sensor can work at 3 different positions (lying, sitting, standing)

CAUTIONS AND WARNINGS:

  • If you are pregnant, consult your phyisician before use.
  • Do not use during the first 6 weeks after childbirth or pelvic surgery as it may interfere with healing.
  • Use of iEase during active symptoms of any pelvic disease such as herpes, a sexually transmitted disease (STD), vaginitis, or yeast infection may cause discomfort and aggravate your symptoms.
  • The iEase is for your personal, individual use and is not to be shared with others.
  • iEase Biofeedback Pelvic Floor Trainer
  • Sensor Probe and storage case
  • Manual
  • Carry pouch
  • 3 x AAA alkaline batteries

Pelvic floor exercises can strengthen and tone the muscle whilst also increasing the blood flow to this region.

Strong or toned pelvic floor muscles can support the extra weight of pregnancy, help in the second stage of labour and, by increasing circulation, assist in healing the perineum between the anus and vagina after birth.

When done regularly and correctly pelvic floor exercises can help to prevent stress incontinence, bladder weakness and prolapse in later life.

Another benefit of carrying out your pelvic floor exercises is that toned pelvic floor muscles can provide women within a greater level of satisfaction during sex, enabling them to experience orgasm.

Exercising and maintaining the strength of your pelvic floor is also important in reducing the symptoms of incontinence.

If you are struggling to complete pelvic floor exercises on your own, you can try using a pelvic floor muscle stimulator. 

Pelvic Floor Stimulators send a gentle electrical signal through a vaginal or anal probe which stimulates the pelvic floor muscle, therefore exercising it for you. Results can often be seen and felt in as little as 3 weeks.

To see our range of pelvic floor exercisers and stimulators, please click here.

You can use it in any position, but most people would find it more comfortable reclining on the sofa or lying in bed with the knees slightly drawn up.

You can also lie on your side with a pillow between your knees if you find it more comfortable.

It is important to find a comfortable position before beginning your 20 minute sessions.

Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI) occurs when there is sudden pressure (“stress”) placed on the bladder.

When the pelvic floor muscles become weakened (due to childbirth, aging or obesity) they are less able to cope with these sudden pressures and therefore allow leakages of urine when you cough, laugh, sneeze or exercise.

The pelvic floor muscles are a group of muscles that wrap around the underside of the bladder and rectum which hold your organs in place. When these muscles become weakened, they struggle to cope with the pressure placed on them by your organs, causing leaks from the bladder (or even the bowel) when you cough, laugh, sneeze or exercise.

SUI is the most common form of incontinence in women.

Pelvic floor exercisers work to strengthen and tone your pelvic floor muscle to improve its condition and enable it to cope with these sudden pressures once again.

Our range of pelvic floor exercisers come with clinically proven Stress programmes to target SUI.

Please click here to see our range.

Your pelvic floor (pubococcygeal or PC) muscles are responsible for holding the bladder, womb and bowel in place and for controlling the muscles that control the anus, vagina and urethra.

Located at the base of your pelvis, the pelvic floor consists of a deep muscle layer and a superficial muscle layer. These work together to keep all of your pelvic organs healthy. 

The muscles form a figure-of-eight stretching between the pubic bone at the front and your coccyx or tailbone at the rear. The urethra and vagina pass through the front hole and the rectum through the rear.

What is IC / PBS? 

Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a condition that results in recurring discomfort or pain in the bladder and the surrounding pelvic region. People may experience mild discomfort, pressure, tenderness, or intense pain in the bladder and pelvic area. Symptoms may include an urgent need to urinate (urgency), a frequent need to urinate (frequency), or a combination of these symptoms. Pain may change in intensity as the bladder fills with urine or as it empties. Women’s symptoms often worsen during menstruation. They may sometimes experience pain with vaginal intercourse..IC / PBS is far more common in women than in men.

What causes IC? 

Some of the symptoms of IC / PBS resemble those of bacterial infection, but medical tests reveal no organisms in the urine of patients with IC / PBS. Furthermore, patients with IC / PBS do not respond to antibiotic therapy. Researchers are working to understand the causes of IC / PBS and to find effective treatments.

In recent years, researchers have isolated a substance found almost exclusively in the urine of people with interstitial cystitis. They have named the substance antiproliferative factor, or APF, because it appears to block the normal growth of the cells that line the inside wall of the bladder. Researchers anticipate that learning more about APF will lead to a greater understanding of the causes of IC and to possible treatments.

Researchers are beginning to explore the possibility that heredity may play a part in some forms of IC. In a few cases, IC has affected a mother and a daughter or two sisters, but it does not commonly run in families.

How is IC / PBS diagnosed? 

Because symptoms are similar to those of other disorders of the urinary bladder and because there is no definitive test to identify IC / PBS, doctors must rule out other treatable conditions before considering a diagnosis of IC / PBS. The most common of these diseases in both genders are urinary tract infections and bladder cancer. IC / PBS is not associated with any increased risk in developing cancer. In men, common diseases include chronic prostatitis or chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

The diagnosis of IC / PBS in the general population is based on

  • Presence of pain related to the bladder, usually accompanied by frequency and urgency
  • Absence of other diseases that could cause the symptoms

Diagnostic tests that help in ruling out other diseases include urinalysis, urine culture, cystoscopy, biopsy of the bladder wall, distention of the bladder under anesthesia, urine cytology, and laboratory examination of prostate secretions.

Treatment - Electrical Nerve Stimulation

TENS is relatively inexpensive and allows the patient to take an active part in treatment. Within some guidelines, the patient decides when, how long, and at what intensity TENS will be used. It has been most helpful in relieving pain and decreasing frequency in patients with Hunners ulcers. If TENS is going to help, improvement is usually apparent in 3 to 4 months.

Treatment - Drugs

Aspirin and ibuprofen may be a first line of defence against mild discomfort. Doctors may recommend other drugs to relieve pain such as Elmiron. Although the latter takes between 2 and 4 months for the pain to subside and up to 6 months to alleviate all symptoms.

Some patients have experienced improvement in their urinary symptoms by taking tricyclic antidepressants (amitriptyline) or antihistamines. Amitriptyline may help to reduce pain, increase bladder capacity, and decrease frequency and nocturia. Some patients may not be able to take it because it makes them too tired during the day. In patients with severe pain, narcotic analgesics such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) with codeine or longer acting narcotics may be necessary.

Diet 

There is no scientific evidence linking diet to IC / PBS, but many doctors and patients find that alcohol, tomatoes, spices, chocolate, caffeinated and citrus beverages, and high-acid foods may contribute to bladder irritation and inflammation. Some patients also note that their symptoms worsen after eating or drinking products containing artificial sweeteners.

Smoking

Many patients feel that smoking makes their symptoms worse. How the by-products of tobacco that are excreted in the urine affect IC / PBS is unknown. Smoking, however, is the major known cause of bladder cancer. Therefore, one of the best things smokers can do for their bladder and their overall health is to quit.

Exercise

Many patients feel that gentle stretching exercises help relieve IC / PBS symptoms.

Bladder Training

Training the bladder to empty at designated times and use relaxation techniques and distractions to keep to the schedule. Gradually, patients try to lengthen the time between scheduled emptying of the bladder.

Surgery 

There are two procedures; fulguration and resection of ulcers. This is done with instruments inserted through the urethra. Fulguration involves burning Hunners ulcers with electricity or a laser. When the area heals, the dead tissue and the ulcer fall off, leaving new, healthy tissue behind. Resection involves cutting around and removing the ulcers. Both treatments are done under anaesthesia and use special instruments inserted into the bladder through a cystoscope. Laser surgery in the urinary tract should be reserved for patients with Hunners ulcers and should be done only by doctors who have had special training and have the expertise needed to perform the procedure.

Another surgical treatment is augmentation, which makes the bladder larger. In most of these procedures, scarred, ulcerated, and inflamed sections of the patients bladder are removed, leaving only the base of the bladder and healthy tissue. A piece of the patients colon (large intestine) is then removed, reshaped, and attached to what remains of the bladder. After the incisions heal, the patient may void less frequently. The effect on pain varies greatly; IC / PBS can sometimes recur on the segment of colon used to enlarge the bladder.

Even in carefully selected patients—those with small, contracted bladders—pain, frequency, and urgency may remain or return after surgery, and patients may have additional problems with infections in the new bladder and difficulty absorbing nutrients from the shortened colon. Some patients are incontinent, while others cannot void at all and must insert a catheter into the urethra to empty the bladder.

A surgical variation of TENS, called sacral nerve root stimulation, involves permanent implantation of electrodes and a unit emitting continuous electrical pulses. Studies of this experimental procedure are now under way.

Bladder removal, called a cystectomy, is another, very infrequently used, surgical option. Once the bladder has been removed, different methods can be used to reroute the urine. In most cases, ureters are attached to a piece of colon that opens onto the skin of the abdomen. This procedure is called a urostomy and the opening is called a stoma. Urine empties through the stoma into a bag outside the body. Some urologists are using a second technique that also requires a stoma but allows urine to be stored in a pouch inside the abdomen. At intervals throughout the day, the patient puts a catheter into the stoma and empties the pouch. Patients with either type of urostomy must be very careful to keep the area in and around the stoma clean to prevent infection. Serious potential complications may include kidney infection and small bowel obstruction.

A third method to reroute urine involves making a new bladder from a piece of the patients colon and attaching it to the urethra. After healing, the patient may be able to empty the newly formed bladder by voiding at scheduled times or by inserting a catheter into the urethra. Only a few surgeons have the special training and expertise needed to perform this procedure.

Are there any special concerns?

Cancer There is no evidence that IC / PBS increases the risk of bladder cancer.

Pregnancy  Researchers have little information about pregnancy and IC / PBS but believe that the disorder does not affect fertility or the health of the foetus. Some women find that their IC / PBS goes into remission during pregnancy, while others experience a worsening of their symptoms.

Coping  The emotional support of family, friends, and other people with IC / PBS is very important in helping patients cope. Studies have found that patients who learn about the disorder and become involved in their own care do better than patients who do not. See the Interstitial Cystitis Association of Americas website to find a group near you.

Research has shown that 30% of women who experience incontinence are unable to voluntarily contract the pelvic floor muscle and require additional assistance to aid their pelvic floor training.

A continence stimulator or pelvic floor exerciser can help. It provides gentle electrical stimulation to the weakened pelvic floor muscle using clinically recognised programmes.

It exercises the muscle for you, using a discrete and comfortable tampon shaped probe, developing the pelvic floor muscle strength and subsequent control.

If used for 20 minutes a day over a period of a few weeks, it can increase muscle strength and subsequent control.

Click here to see our range of Pelvic Floor Exercisers.

You can fill in the short survey below to see what type of incontinence you have: Stress, Urge or Mixed.

What type of Incontinence do I have?

You should always speak to your medical advisor or continence advisor before seeking self-treatment for incontinence.

 

Try to tighten the muscles around your vagina and back passage and lift up, as if you are stopping yourself passing water and wind at the same time. A quick way of locating the pelvic floor muscles is to try and stop the flow of urine, mid stream.

Do not do this regularly as you may begin to retain urine.

Once you’ve located your muscles, make sure you relax and empty your bladder completely.

If you are still a little unsure as to whether or not you are exercising the right muscles, put a couple of your fingers or thumb into your vagina. You should feel a gentle squeeze when carrying out the exercise.

 

1 in 3 women (50% of women over 40), and 1 in 7 men will suffer from some form of incontinence during their lives; be it post-childbirth or later in life as pelvic floor muscles weaken.

The severity of incontinence can vary. Even though it is not considered life-threatening, it can cause depression, isolation and soreness. Pelvic floor exercisers are recognised as an effective method of strengthening the muscles that support the bladder and bowel, and are a more cost-effective, better long-term solution than containment pads.

Why use a TensCare Pelvic Floor Exerciser?

Pelvic floor exercisers and trainers are seen as the most effective way to prevent issues with incontinence. Yet, 1 in 3 women do not know how or are unable to voluntarily exercise their pelvic floor muscle themselves. Pelvic Floor Exercisers can play a vital role in educating women about their pelvic floor and the sensation they should feel when doing pelvic floor exercises, helping to improve muscle tone and associated problems. They can also train pelvic floor muscles in men by using electrical stimulation through an anal probe or electrode.

Benefits to using a TensCare Pelvic Floor Exerciser:

  • Safe and drug-free with no side effects
  • Easy-to-use at home
  • Non-surgical
  • Clinically proven programmes
  • Reduces the usage of containment pads
  • Improves sexual stimulation for women through strengthened pelvic floor muscle
  • Can help to reduce leakage
  • Discreet
  • Helps to avoid rectal prolapse
  • Helps to ease chronic pelvic pain
  • Helps men’s prostate to function

How can Pelvic Floor Exercisers help Urinary Incontinence?

Pelvic Floor Exercisers are portable EMS (Electrical Muscle Stimulation) units which help to build the pelvic muscle strength whilst educating women how to control their pelvic floor. Pelvic Floor Exercisers work by sending gentle stimulation (EMS) to your pelvic floor muscle through a vaginal or anal probe, or via self adhesive electrode pads using clinically recognised programmes. The units exercise and tone the pelvic floor muscle helping you to gain control of your bladder naturally. For best results, it is recommended to use your Pelvic Floor Exerciser in conjunction with Kegel Exercises for best results.

The benefits of pelvic floor exercises for women, particularly after childbirth, are well documented. However, these simple exercises are also very valuable for men following prostatectomy or other prostate surgery where removing the prostate has damaged the area between the bladder and urethra resulting in some form of urinary incontinence whether it is Stress, Mixed or Urge.

A study following men through the first year after prostatectomy found pelvic floor exercises are effective in terms of reducing incontinence. The iTouch Sure Pelvic Floor Exerciser for Men locates and tones your pelvic floor muscle helping you to rebuild muscle strength and reduce any accidental leakages.

How can Pelvic Floor Exercisers help Faecal Incontinence?

Faecal incontinence can be the result of weakened or poorly functioning anal sphincter muscles or damage to the nerves controlling them.

Electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) can be used to re-educate the anal sphincter to contract. The treatments aim to progress towards graduated active exercises, in order to improve pelvic floor muscles strength and endurance and to regain function.

How do men use a Pelvic Floor Exerciser?

The iTouch Sure is a discreet unit with an intra-anal probe. The unit uses comfortable muscle stimulation to exercise your pelvic floor muscle to aid recovery from urinary and faecal incontinence.

For the more common Urge incontinence, the iTouch Sure is supplied with self-adhesive electrode pads that are placed either side of the spine. It uses gentle electrical stimulation to sooth irritable bladder muscles. Additional electrode pads, replacement probes and Go Gel lubricating gel are all available to purchase as accessories.

Clinically proven

A recent clinical trial carried out on the TensCare iTouch Sure Pelvic Floor Exerciser has been conducted in the US with excellent results.  Participants in the study experienced a 57.1% reduction in the use of continence pads and a significant improvement in incontinence episodes after only 12 weeks of using the iTouch Sure. The chart below provides the results from the clinical trial: